Courses and Workshops
     
 
June 2, 2017 Course Full — Electrofishing Certification Course Class 2  
 
June 5 to 9, 2017 Ontario Stream Assessment Protocol Training Course
June 3 to 4, 2017 Introductory Benthos Identification Level 1 Course
   
   
   
 
 

Headwater Drainage Feature Guideline Implementation: Practitioners Experiences Eastern Ontario

Thank you for joining us at the Headwater Drainage Feature Guideline Implementation: Practitioners Experiences – Eastern Ontario Workshop.

Thanks again to everyone for participating.
Regards, Headwaters Steering Committee

   


November 7, 2016,
Hilton Garden Inn Ottawa Airport, 2400 Alert Road
Ottawa

The workshop updated participants on some of the work that has been implemented in since the 2011 Eastern Ontario Headwaters workshop.  Updates included advances in policy, monitoring, research and restoration which were all core themes at the 2011 workshop.  Participants heard a range of case studies from Eastern Ontario that collectively address how to incorporate headwater management in routine management decisions, policy development, monitoring and science understanding.  Participants heard from experts from Conservation Authorities, the City of Ottawa and the private sector on local success stories.  Approximately 90 participants came together to receive updates on the work that has been done for the past 5 years since the first workshop.

 
Time Download
Presentation

Presentation Title

Presenter

       
9:10-9:45



Headwater Drainage Features Overview
Advances in Policy: Headwaters Get Protection

Glen McDonald, Director of Planner, Rideau Valley Conservation Authority


9:45-10:15

Increasing Resiliency: Identifying and maintaining HDFs from a municipal perspective

Jennifer Boyer, Planner, Land Use and Natural Systems Unit, City of Ottawa


10:30-11:00

Science Advances Our Understanding of Headwater Systems  — Trim the Tribs Research

Les Stanfield, Ecohealth Solutions


11:00-11:30

Headwater monitoring and reporting practical uses from a watershed management context

Jennifer Lamoureux, Aquatic and Fish Habitat Biologist, Rideau Valley Conservation Authority


11:30-12:00

Application of Headwater Module
to Management

Shelley Gorenc, Senior Geomorphologist, BEACON Environmental


1:00-1:30

Practical Implementation of the HDF Guidelines within Eastern Ontario

Whitney Moore, Biologist, Dillon Consulting Limited


1:30-2:00

Subwatershed Planning: Incorporating Headwaters: Lessons Learned from North Markham

Shelley Gorenc, Senior Geomorphologist, BEACON Environmental


2:00-2:30

Cardinal Creek Village and Area 6
Stittsville Headwaters Drainage
Features Assessment Case Study Examples

Michelle Lavictoire, Bowfin Environmental Consulting


2:45-3:15

Kanata South Link or 4100 Innes Road/2025
Mer Bleue Road, Orleans, Headwaters
Drainage Features Assessment Case study

Josh Mansell, Biologist, Stantec


3:15-3:45

North West Quadrant Development in Kemptville ON, Headwater Drainage Feature  Assessment Case Study

Anthony Francis, Senior Ecologist, Kilgour and Associates Ltd.

 
 
 
 
  Previous Workshops
 


2016 — Ontario Stream Assessment Protocol Training Course for: Headwater sampling (S4.M10), Instream crossing and barrier attribution (S4.M9)

A follow-up workshop is planned for the fall to go over case studies for the Headwater Drainage Feature Guideline implementation.

April 8 — Workshop 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Location
— Rideau Valley Conservation Authority office in Manotick (3889 Rideau Valley Drive)


2015

November 16, 2015, Nottawasaga Inn, 6015 Highway 89, Alliston, ON

Better Climate Adaptation and Resilience through Headwater Drainage Features —
Practitioners Experiences in this new paradigm

This workshop is sponsored by the headwater steering committe1 will update participants on a range of initiatives from across southern Ontario that collectively address how to incorporate headwater management in routine management decisions, policy development, climate adaptation initiatives and science understanding. Participants will hear from experts from Conservation Authorities, Universities and the private sector on local success stories. They will learn about what works and doesn’t work from those most active in this emerging area of cross-specialization.  In-depth understanding will emerge through break-out sessions to explore the complexity of the issues and will ultimately shape future activities.  There will be opportunities to share experiences and help shape future initiatives in this emerging area.

Agenda:

Time

Topic

Presenter

8:45 – 9:15 a.m

Registration

 

9:15 a.m.

Welcome – and workshop objectives, logistics etc.

Jennifer Lamoureux, Aquatic and Fish Habitat Biologist, Rideau Valley Conservation Authority

9:30 a.m.

Climate Change Adaptation and Ecohealth Require Better Management of Headwaters

Les Stanfield, Ecohealth Solutions

10:00 a.m.

Advances in Policy: Headwaters Get Protection

Laura Del Giudice, Senior Ecologist, Toronto and Region Conservation Authority and Jennifer Lamoureux, Aquatic and Fish Habitat Biologist, Rideau Valley Conservation Authority

10:30 a.m.

Science Advances Our Understanding of Headwater Systems — Trim the Tribs Research

Les Stanfield, Ecohealth Solutions

11:00 a.m.

Headwater monitoring and reporting practical uses from a watershed management context

Jennifer Lamoureux, Aquatic and Fish Habitat Biologist, Rideau Valley Conservation Authority

11:30 p.m.

Round Table discussion — Challenges to be faced

 

12:00 – 1:00 p.m.

Lunch

 

1:00 p.m.

Perspectives from Halton and Beyond

Nyssa Clubine, Stream Corridor and Environmental Analyst, Natural Resource Solutions Inc.

1:30 p.m.

Sub watershed Planning: Incorporating Headwaters: Lessons Learned from North Markham

Shelley Gorenc, Senior Geomorphologist, BEACON Environmental

2:00 – 2:15 p.m.

Break

 

2:15 – 2:45 p.m.

Adapting to Climate Change in Peel Region and TRCA

Christine Tu, Senior Ecologist, Toronto and Region Conservation Authority

2:45 – 3:15 p.m. Incorporating Headwater Management into Municipal Planning: Experiences of the City of Ottawa Jennifer Boyer, Planner, Land Use and Natural Systems Unit, City of Ottawa
3:15–4:00 p.m. Facilitated Discussion; Gaps in Providing Linkages to Climate Adaptation (policy, science and management)  

This workshop is sponsored by the headwater steering commitee, an ad-hoc group of conservation authority, private sector, and eNGO individuals that have been collaborating to develop an integrated approach to better managing and understanding headwaters since 2006. Summaries of much of the effort are available at:

http://trca.on.ca/the-living-city/water-flood-management/headwater-study.dot

 
 
Thank you for participating!
 

Thanks for joining us at the Headwater Streams Workshop. We would appreciate your feedback on our workshop. Please complete our online survey at www.surveymonkey.com/s/D86L9PG

Thanks again to everyone for participating and thank you to our generous sponsors — Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, Rideau Valley Conservation Authority, Toronto and Region Conservation and the Rideau Valley Rural Clea Water Program.

Regards,
Your Local Arrangements Commitee
March 2, 2010


 
Toronto & Region Conservation Authority Headwater Study
They are updating the Interim Headwater Guideline, and they want to hear from you!
Please click here to provide comments
 


Headwater Streams Workshop Presentations – Eastern Region (February 25, 2011)

Workshop Moderator: Diane Downey, A/Director of Communications, Rideau Valley Conservation Authority

Afternoon Breakout Session Facilitators: Policy/Guidelines Session: Amy MacPherson, Planner, Natural Systems, Infrastructure Services and Community Sustainability, City of Ottawa Research Session: Michelle Lavictoire, Biologist, Bowfin Environmental Consulting Inc. Monitoring Session:  Shaun Thompson, District Ecologist/Biologist, Ministry of Natural Resources (Kemptville District) Restoration Session:  Bruce Kilgour PhD, Biologist, Kilgour and Associates Ltd.

 
Breakout Session Notes (81 kb)
 

Time

Topic

Presenter

8:30-9:00

Registration

 

9:00-9:05

Welcome and Opening Remarks

Dell Hallett, General Manager, Rideau Valley Conservation Authority

9:05-9:25

Introduction to the Theory and Science of Headwater Streams

Abstract: The presentation will review some basic concepts including Law of Stream Orders and the River Continuum Concept to identify or extrapolate the transition of various features and functions expected in the most upstream reaches of watersheds. Features and functional criteria to be reviewed include flow regime, geomorphology, water quality, vegetation, organic inputs, invertebrates and fish habitat. A Rapid Assessment field chart based on simple observations will be used to summarize and classify streams as simple or complex contributing habitat or seasonal fish habitat. The science of headwaters is new and emerging such that the presentation should be challenged and encourage discussion and refinement of the Interim Headwater Guidelines. The next challenge not discussed is the application of policies but this information is applicable to restoration or “realignment” activities.

Download presentation here.
Powerpoint Presentation — 740 kb


Bob Morris, Manager of Natural Heritage, Credit Valley Conservation

9:25-9:45

Advancing the Science around Indirect and Seasonal Fish Habitat

Abstract: The Greater Toronto Area is one of the fastest growing areas in North America, and TRCA staff were concerned with alterations proposed to headwater drainage features (HDFs) resulting from urban development, such as channel piping, grade lowering and channelization.  Since 2006, TRCA has been conducting primary and secondary research to better understand the natural functions of headwater drainage features.  A literature review was completed, which identified the state of the science as well as priority gaps.  These recommendations made through this review directed the initiation of primary research on the significance of headwater drainage features as indirect and seasonal fish habitat.  The results of this work will be discussed.

Download presentation here.
Powerpoint Presentation — 8.8 kb


Laura Del Giudice, Planning Ecology Supervisor, Toronto and Region Conservation Authority

9:45-10:05

Quantifying the factors that influence flow response to storm events in headwater streams

Abstract: How climate, geology and land use specifically affect flow conditions in headwater streams is poorly understood and hampers decision-makers ability to manage impacts from development. In 2007, crest stage gauges and physical measurements of stream condition were used to quantify peak flow responses at 110 sites located on headwater streams on the north shore of Lake Ontario. Rain fall to each catchment was measured using spline procedures from 20+ rain gauge stations. The relationship between peak discharge and rainfall was quantified as a flashiness index and regressed to catchment attributes of drainage area, geology, slope and a land cover index. Residuals of this model were regressed against the area of tile drainage in each catchment to determine the degree to which this attribute independently explained flow condition. Finally, the flashiness index was compared to a hindcasted reference condition as a means of quantifying the degree of alteration in flow condition within the study area. This presentation will highlight the field procedures used and their reliability, the study findings and the implications of this study to protecting fish habitat in downstream reaches.

Download presentation here.
Powerpoint Presentation — 20 mb


Les Stanfield, Fish Habitat Specialist, Ministry of Natural Resources

10:05-10:25

State-of-the-art scientific research on headwater stream flow generation: a hydrologic and geomorphic perspective

Abstract: not avaiable today

Download presentation here.
Powerpoint Presentation — 6 mb


April James, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Geography Canadian Research Chair in Watershed Analysis and Modeling Nipissing University

10:25-10:45

BREAK

 

10:45-11:00

Geomorphological and Ecological Functions within a Headwater Channel Network: implications for management

Abstract: Over a two-year period, a series of ephemeral drainage features have been subjected to regular monitoring. The purpose of the monitoring has been to quantify processes that are operative within small ephemeral channels. The upstream drainage areas of each of the

sites were less than 20 Ha. All sites were situated within the same geology with slightly different land uses; ranging from agriculture to more natural conditions. The specific focus of the monitoring was on characterizing the flow and sediment regime. Each site included a temporary stream gauge, and a series of sediment traps. This monitoring was augmented by repeated cross-sectional surveys and sampling for TSS. Finally, this monitoring data was linked to several other stations further downstream. The results were intriguing in that proportionally more water is produce from these catchments than downstream areas. Also, while a substantial amount of the sediment within the channels is the product of the agricultural fields, there is evidence that natural scour and fill processes regularly occur. This finding alone, suggests that these channels, which tend to lack substantial definable form, have the ability to behave like much larger channels, with respect to channel dynamics and response to changes in flow and sediment regimes. The downstream contributions of these features poses implications for the management of these systems, given on-going development pressures which have, traditionally focused on ‘replication’ of these features through stormwater management techniques.

Download presentation here.
Powerpoint Presentation — 6 mb


Joanna Eyquem, Senior Fluvial Scientist, Parish Geomorphic Ltd.

11:00-11:20

Provincial Headwater Monitoring Protocol

Abstract:

Download presentation here.
Powerpoint Presentation — 1 mb

Les Stanfield, Fish Habitat Specialist, Ministry of Natural Resources /Mari Veliz, Healthy Watersheds Coordinator, Ausable Bayfield Conservation Authority

11:20-11:40

Geomatics Tools for Identifying Headwater Systems

Abstract: Many ecologists and planners have used remote sensing and GIS (i.e. geomatics) to enhance mapping, monitoring, and ultimately understanding the management of ecological systems. Although these tools can also be used for headwater systems, the nature of their hydrology presents unique challenges to their use. Headwater streams have no or very few upstream contributing tributaries and small drainage areas, are often temporary, and are relatively narrow in width and short in length. Thus, an ideal geomatics solution must make use of data with high temporal and spatial resolutions. Because acquisition and analysis of such data are costly, careful consideration must be given to data input, analysis method and interpretation of results. Furthermore, a sound understanding of the strengths and limitations of these tools is crucial for appropriate application. This presentation is a brief summary of geomatics data and methods suitable for headwater systems and how these data can be used in tandem with field data to achieve better understanding and management.

Download presentation here.
Powerpoint Presentation — 6 mb


Adam Hogg, Remote Sensing Specialist, Ministry of Natural Resources

11:40-12:00

Questions for the speakers

All

12:00-1:00

LUNCH

 

1:00-1:20

Headwater Restoration Planning in the GTA

Abstract: Toronto and Region Conservation (TRCA) is one of the leading agencies in the field of ecological restoration in the Greater Toronto Area.  Restoration planning to date has focused on a more terrestrial approach, lacking a complete picture of hydrologic function. In order to properly meet all natural cover targets across the watershed, TRCA has created a process utilizing desktop and field assessment techniques to identify and prioritize restoration opportunities on an “eco-hydrologic” systems basis. The desktop portion of this planning is rooted in an understanding of topography and drainage to delineate and prioritize restoration opportunities (wetland, riparian and forest).  Using GIS, drainage lines and catchment boundaries are derived to determine the intermittent and permanent flow of water, as well as depressions on the landscape for riparian or wetland restoration projects. These features are then field verified.  30 ha catchments are delineated within the study area, which are overlaid onto other GIS information layers (wetland, forest, riparian cover, etc.).  Summary statistics on percent natural cover within these 30 ha catchments are calculated and compared to prioritize areas for restoration and protection.  Priority catchments are overlaid onto watershed strategy priorities (Terrestrial Natural Heritage, Fisheries, etc.) to further refine the target areas.  Armed with the desktop information, restoration opportunities are identified in the field by trained technicians.  Data is collected in the field to help prioritize individual sites.  Resources are then allocated to restore and protect high priority sites in high priority areas.  

Download presentation here.
Powerpoint Presentation — 41 mb


Ralph Toninger, Senior Project Manager, Restoration Services and John Stille, Project Manager, Restoration and Environmental Monitoring Projects, Toronto and Region Conservation Authority

1:20-1:35

Agriculture Headwater Streams and Restoration Opportunities

Abstract: not available at this time.

Download presentation here.
Powerpoint Presentation — 14 mb


Bradley Wright, Infrastructure Planner, City of Ottawa

1:35-1:45

Applying DFO’s Risk Management Framework to Headwater Projects

Abstract: not available at this time.

Download presentation here.
Powerpoint Presentation — 1.78 mb


Thomas Hoggarth, Habitat Team Leader, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, OGLA Eastern District

1:45-2:10

Conservation Authorities Act and the Provincial Policy/Legislative tools for Protecting Headwater Functions

Abstract: There are many legislative tools that can be used to address the protection of natural features generally and headwater areas specifically.  This presentation will focus on available tools under the Planning Act.  The Planning Act is the principle instrument used by municipalities to control and direct development within their boundaries.   The Province of Ontario establishes basic principles upon which development review activities will be undertaken. The Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing is the responsible provincial Ministry.

Download presentation here.
Powerpoint Presentation — 5 mb


The Conservation Authorities Act, valley and stream  corridors and headwaters

Abstract: Following Hurricane Hazel’s impact on Toronto and other parts of southern Ontario in 1954 a decision was made to address water quantity and natural hazards management using the watershed approach.  Since this time CA’s have been charged with the ability to regulate development in specific areas so as to ensure public safety and the protection of natural systems occurs.  Over time the scope of regulations made under the authority of the CA Act has broadened.   Generally the “control of flooding, erosion, pollution, and the conservation of land” are key considerations in how this job gets done.  This presentation will explore the tools available to CA’s under the Conservation Authorities Act to protect headwater areas.
 

Download presentation here.
Powerpoint Presentation — 6 mb


Don Maciver, Director of Planning & Regulations, Rideau Valley Conservation Authority

2:10-2:25

Interim Headwater Drainage Features Guideline

Abstract: In partnership with CVC, TRCA developed a guideline that provides Conservation Authority (CA) staff and urban development consultants with direction on how to evaluate, classify and manage Headwater Drainage Features (HDFs). HDFs need to be managed in the landscape through the development process in order to ensure critical functions are not lost. The guideline provides direction on the field data required to evaluate HDFs, including information about flow, fish habitat, vegetation, channel form, and linkages. These field data are then used to classify the stream into one of five habitat categories for the stream reach. Management recommendations are then applied to the stream reach based on the assigned classification through the development process (i.e. plan review). An overview of the guideline will be provided in the presentation.

Download presentation here.
Powerpoint Presentation — 6 mb


Laura Del Giudice, Planning Ecology Supervisor, Toronto and Region Conservation Authority

2:25-2:45

Breakout Session 1

Session Results:

1) Research, 
2) Monitoring, 
3) Policy/ Guidelines
4) Restoration

 

2:45-3:05

Presentation of Results

Facilitators

3:05-3:25

Strategy Prioritization Exercise

All

3:25-3:45

Breakout Session 2

Session Results:

1) Research, 
2) Monitoring, 
3) Policy/ Guidelines
4) Restoration

 

3:45-4:05

Presentation of Results

Download results here.
PDF
— 44 kb

Facilitators

4:05-4:20

Where do we go from here?

Les Stanfield, Fish Habitat Specialist, Ministry of Natural Resources and Laura Del Giudice, Planning Ecology Supervisor, Toronto and Region Conservation Authority

4:20-4:25

Closing Remarks

Moderator

 

Contact:

Michelle Paton
Rideau Valley Conservation Authority
Box 599, 3889 Rideau Valley Drive Manotick, Ontario K4M 1A5
tel: 613-692-3571 ext. 1177
fax: 613-692-0831
e-mail: headwaters@rvca.ca